RIDDOR – What, When, Who – A simple guide

26
Jul

Figures released for health and safety statistics for Great Britain (2015/16) show that accidents and workplace injury are a major issues for businesses which include:

  • 1.3 million working people suffering from a work-related illness
  • 2,542 mesothelioma deaths due to past asbestos exposures (2015)
  • 137 workers killed at work (2016/17)
  • 72,702 other injuries to employees reported under RIDDOR
  • 621,000 injuries occurred at work according to the Labour Force Survey
  • 30.4 million working days lost due to work-related illness and workplace injury
  • £14.1 billion estimated cost of injuries and ill health from current working conditions (2014/15)

We receive a lot of questions when accidents happen at your places of work so we have put together a useful guide on what you need to know about RIDDOR.

I have heard of the acronym RIDDOR but what does it actually stand for?

RIDDOR stands for the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations.

The purpose of the RIDDOR regulations is to allow the HSE and local authorities to monitor accident trends, identify how risks arise and investigate serious accidents.

Who does it effect?

RIDDOR effects anyone who is an employer, self employed or in control of work premises as you will have duties under the RIDDOR regulations.

RIDDOR regulations make the reporting of certain accidents, ill health and dangerous occurrences to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) a legal requirement. The regulations apply to Great Britain but not to Northern Ireland where separate Regulations are in force.

What is an ‘accident’?

In relation to RIDDOR, an accident is a separate, identifiable, unintended incident, which causes physical injury. This specifically includes acts of non-consensual violence to people at work.

So when do I have to report? 

You must report an accident within 10 days.

For accidents resulting in the over-seven-day incapacitation of a worker, you must notify the enforcing authority within 15 days of the incident, using the appropriate online form.

What do I have to report?

  • Accidents resulting in the death of any person
  • Major injuries include: amputations; dislocations; fractures (other than fingers or toes); loss of sight and eye injuries; injuries from electric shock or electrical burn leading to unconsciousness, resuscitation or over 24 hour hospitalisation; any other injury requiring admittance to hospital for over 25 hours; hypothermia, heat induced illness or unconsciousness; any injury requiring resuscitation; unconsciousness caused by asphyxia or exposure to a harmful substance or biological agent, and; acute illnesses requiring medical treatment or loss of consciousness arising from absorption of any substance by inhalation, ingestion or through the skin or where there is reason to believe this resulted from exposure to a biological agent, its toxins or infected material.
  • Dangerous occurrences – whilst not limited to, it does cover the following: collapse of machinery and structures; explosions and bursting of pipe work and closed vessels; contact with overhead power lines; electrical fires or explosions; demolition failure, unintentional explosions or misfires; accidental release of biological agent or substance which may damage health; scaffold collapse; failure of diving equipment; train collisions; unintended collapse of a building or structure, wall or floor, false work, and: uncontrolled release of flammable liquids and gases.
  • Occupational diseases include: poisonings; skin diseases such as dermatitis and skin cancer, ulcer, oil folliculitis/acne; lung diseases including asthma, farmer’s lung, pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, mesothelioma; infections such as leptospirosis, hepatitis, tuberculosis, anthrax, legionellosis, tetanus, and; other conditions such as occupational cancer musculoskeletal disorders, decompression illness and hand-arm vibration syndrome.
  • Reportable diseases include: poisonings; skin diseases such as dermatitis and skin cancer, ulcer, oil folliculitis/acne; lung diseases including asthma, farmer’s lung, pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, mesothelioma; infections such as leptospirosis, hepatitis, tuberculosis, anthrax, legionellosis, tetanus, and; other conditions such as occupational cancer musculoskeletal disorders, decompression illness and hand-arm vibration syndrome.
  • An employee or self-employed person being away from work, or unable to perform their normal work duties, for more than seven consecutive days as the result of their injury. The report must be made within 15 days of the accident.

Who can report

‘A responsible persons’ including employers, the self-employed and people in control of work premises should submit reports under RIDDOR.

How to report

You can report using the online form or alternatively, for fatal accidents or accidents resulting in specified injuries to workers only, you can phone 0345 300 9923.

A few examples of RIDDOR Accidents

  • A customer is accidentally scalded while being served hot soup by staff and is taken to hospital for treatment.
  • A barman is attacked by a member of the public, when he asked the customer to leave as the bar was closing.
  • A member of the public tripped over a trailing cable and hurt herself badly. An ambulance wasn’t called as a friend drove her to a hospital.

Examples of what is not reportable under RIDDOR

  • A member of the public fell over in our premises, as a precaution they went to hospital, but when examined the hospital said they had no injuries.
  • A resident in a nursing home was hit by another resident and taken to hospital for treatment.
  • Suicide of a guest staying at a hotel.

If you are unsure about whether or not an incident should be reported, or what actions you need to take, CSC customers should contact the helpdesk

 

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